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Welcome to the Research and Innovation Area where you can read about why research is important, the research projects Royal Primary Care is involved in and most importantly how to become involved in medical research.

The NHS is involved in health research to find better ways to prevent, detect and treat illnesses. The UK’s health research has led to ground breaking discoveries such as Penicillin and DNA sequencing.

GP surgeries conduct research and are an often overlooked, but very important, part of the NHS research effort that you can easily assist.  

In the past five years, over 200,000 people in the East Midlands region took part in health research but we need more people to get involved. Speak to one of our doctors or nurses to get more information on how you could help us.

Ways of participating:

Research isn’t all about new drugs and odd tests! You could help by simply filling in a questionnaire or telling your story to researchers. There are different ways for you to be involved in research that can vary from helping to develop research questions, applying for funding and ethical approval, sitting on advisory groups, carrying out the research and disseminating the research findings.

Another helpful way is to become a patient research ambassador - someone who promotes health research from a patient point of view. They could be a patient, service user, carer or lay person who is enthusiastic about health research and is willing to communicate that to other patients, the public, as well as other healthcare professionals. Many patients, carers, and members of the public are already doing excellent work in the healthcare research community.

If you are interested or want more information explore these links

https://www.nihr.ac.uk/patients-and-public/how-to-join-in/patient-research-ambassadors/

https://youtu.be/yZ5dPfyL2Nw

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